🚨Picky eaters choose us! Get 50% OFF Now. 🚨

Breed Corgi
  • Breed Group
    Herding Group
  • Temperament
    Affectionate, Smart, Alert
  • Demeanor
    N/A
  • Vital Stats
    • Energetic
    • N/A
    • Weekly Brushing
    • Shedding Seasonally

Corgi

Corgi Facts and Best Dog Food - NutriCanine

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi originated in 1107 AD. One theory suggests Pembrokes were brought to Wales by Flemish weavers. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi was developed in the Pembrokeshire area where they were used for herding, guarding and companionship. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi shares many similarities with the Cardigan Welsh Corgi. However, the Pembroke and Cardigan were officially recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) as separate breeds in 1934. The Pembrokes is known to be the more popular of the two breeds.

Create the perfect meal plan for your Corgi


Corgi Appearance 

The average weight of a male Corgi is 30 pounds and up to 28 pounds for females. Corgis can grow to be 10-12 inches in height. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is recognizable for its foxy face, short stature, docked tail and pointed muzzle and ears. Unlike the Pembroke, Cardigans tend to have smaller pointer ears and usually keep their long, full tails.


Corgi Temperament 

The Corgi is known for having a friendly, affectionate and fun-loving temperament. These dogs have a lot of personality packed into a small body. Corgis love to interact with people and get along well with children. They’re known for being big barkers and tend to be reserved around strangers as well as dogs and cats they don’t know.

Learn how diet effects your dog’s behaviour


Grooming Your Corgi

Corgis have a thick weatherproof double-coat. They have a short, light under-coat and a longer,  coarse outer-coat. Corgis sheds a significant amount on a daily basis and more so in the spring and fall. Daily brushing is the best way to keep your Corgi’s coat healthy and looking its best. Corgis also need regular nail trimming, ear cleaning and dental care.

Give your dog a shinier coat with fresh food


Training & Exercise for Corgis

Corgis need significant training and early socialization to grow into a well-adjusted adult. The Corgi’s desire to please its owner extends to training and its eagerness to learn. It’s also important to use positive reinforcement and reward-based training to keep your Corgi motivated.

Some Corgis pack a lot of energy for a small frame. In order to stay physically and mentally stimulated these dogs require an ample amount of daily activity. It’s recommended that you provide your Corgi with about an hour of exercise daily. Corgis love long walks, slow jogs, playing fetch, tug of war and swimming!


Health Considerations for Corgis 

The Corgi is a generally healthy breed with a lifespan of 12-13 years. To ensure your Corgi gets the most out of these years, it’s important to be aware of what signs of illnesses to look for so you can quickly address any health concern. Some of the common health issues Corgis are prone to include cataracts, degenerative myelopathy, hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and von willebrand disease (vWD).

Cataracts

A cataract is developed when the lens of the eye clouds, preventing light from reaching the retina. Signs to watch for in your Corgi include changes in eye colour, cloudy pupils in one or both eyes, confusion and clumsiness. This condition can be treated with surgery but if left untreated can lead to blindness.

Degenerative Myelopathy

As a result of their long bodies, Corgis are highly susceptible to degenerative myelopathy.  This neurological disorder affects the spinal cord and can lead to paralysis in your Corgi’s hind legs. Some early signs to look for in your Corgi include difficulty standing up, stumbling, knuckling of the toes and progressive weakness of the hind legs. Although there’s no cure, physical therapy can help manage the symptoms and prolong the use of the hind legs.

Hip dysplasia

Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is one of the most common canine ailments. It’s a genetic condition that causes an abnormal formation of the hip socket which can eventually lead to lameness and arthritis of the joints. This hereditary disease can be magnified by factors including excessive growth rate, age, types of exercise and improper weight and nutrition. While mild conditions can be managed with prescription medication and physical therapy, more severe cases could require surgery. To prevent or reduce the severity of hip dysplasia, it’s important to ensure your Corgi  gets a proper diet and the right amount of exercise.

Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA)

Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) occurs when the retina of a Corgi’s eye starts to deteriorate. Some dogs may experience total blindness, while others remain unaffected but can be carriers of the gene. There is currently no treatment that can cure this disease however, you can learn to spot the signs early to ensure your Corgi continues to live a fulfilling life. Some common signs to look for include night blindness, bumping into objects and inability to follow hand signals/commands.

It’s important to monitor your Corgi’s vision to detect various eye conditions early on, especially in the first years of their life. It’s recommended that you have your Corgi’s eyes checked by your vet on a regular basis. 

von Willebrand Disease (vWD)

Von Willebrand Disease is the most common inherited bleeding disorder found in dogs, particularly in Corgis. This disease is a clotting disorder that causes excessive bleeding. It happens when there’s a deficiency of the protein von Willebrand factor. When an injury occurs, this protein is needed to help the platelets form blood clots to seal broken blood vessels. Symptoms can include nosebleeds, bloody urine or stool and prolonged or excessive bleeding during or after surgery. If your Corgi has a mild or moderate type of the disease, they can still go on to live a normal life under careful watch. 

Strengthen your dog’s immune system


What Makes a Corgi Unique? 

Corgi means “dwarf dog” in Celtic Welsh

The Corgi's name is said to have two possible origins. The first is that it comes from  the Welsh Celtic language, where cor means dwarf and gi means dog. Another possible interpretation is that the word cor  means watch over or gather combined with gi which means dog.

Corgis are excellent herding dogs

As part of the herding group, Corgis have been used for herding livestock as early as the 10th century. Traditionally used to herd sheep and cattle, Corgis would nip at their feet and legs to move them along. The Corgi is also considered the shortest of all herding breeds.

Corgis are “enchanted dogs”

Legend has it that Corgis are enchanted dogs. It’s said that the fairies and elves of Wales would use them to pull tiny coaches, work fairy cattle and serve as steed for the fairy warriors. According to legend, those with an understanding heart and keen eye can see the faint outline of the “fairy saddle” over the Corgi’s shoulders. 

Queen Elizabeth loves Corgis

The Corgis popularity can largely be attributed to Queen Elizabeth II. As an avid Corgi fan she has owned over 30 Corgis in her lifetime. The Queen met her first Corgi named Dookie when King George VI brought him home from a kennel in 1933. 

Create a custom Corgi Meal Plan


Why NutriCanine Is Great For Corgis

  • Best Dog Food for a Corgi Puppy (1-4 years)
    The best dog food for your Corgi puppy will be high quality and nutritionally complete to ensure they grow into a healthy adult. Corgis will typically reach their full adult size around 12 months old. When choosing the best dog food for your Corgi it can help to understand the special needs of this particular breed. For example, Corgis are prone to gaining weight, which makes it important to monitor their calorie intake to prevent extra strain on their bodies. Choosing a dog food that contains well-sourced protein, nutrients, and a proper amount of fat will help in the development of healthy bones and joints. It’s also important to consider dog food that is free from any fillers and artificial ingredients which can help reduce the risk of feeding allergies. The best dog food for your Corgi puppy will support healthy growth and consider the breed’s health concerns. As your Corgi puppy is still in the process of development, another factor to consider is the consistency of their dog food. Your Corgi will have an easier time digesting soft dog food as opposed to hard dry kibble. NutriCanine’s nutrient-dense and easily digestible meals are developed by a dog food formulation specialist for an incredible flavour and texture that your Corgi puppy will love. Our dog food recipes offer complete and balanced nutrition for your pup, with human-edible animal proteins and our unique blend of highly digestible fruits and vegetables. All our dog food recipes are freshly prepared with no hormones, no antibiotics, and no artificial preservatives, colours or flavours.
  • Best Dog Food for an Adult Corgi (5-7 years)
    When selecting the best dog food for your adult Corgi, it’s important to ensure their nutritional needs are met without going overboard on the calories. As Corgis are prone to overeat, high quality and well-balanced dog food is essential to maintain a healthy body weight. The ideal dog food for your Corgi will include lean protein such as poultry and fish, low-moderate fat content, wholesome ingredients and plenty of vitamins and nutrients. At NutriCanine we will take the time to learn about your Corgi and create a customized meal plan for their unique nutritional needs. Our dog food recipes come pre-portioned and ready to serve for a mess-free mealtime! NutriCanine dog food recipes are freshly prepared with real, human-edible, locally sourced ingredients.
  • Best Dog Food for a Senior Corgi
    Once Corgis reach seniority their energy levels begin to slow down considerably. It’s important to feed your Corgi dog food that contains high quality ingredients and is low in calories and fat. Due to the fact that Corgis have a higher risk of gaining weight, it’s crucial that their diet is tailored to their age and health needs. NutriCanine’s raw dog food recipes are specially formulated to accommodate your senior dog’s nutritional needs; however, our gently cooked line might be easier for an older dog to transition to if they’re not accustomed to fresh dog food. Our fresh dog food comes in a variety of delicious recipes that your Corgi will absolutely love, including high-quality proteins like chicken, turkey, beef, lamb, and chicken and salmon. There are numerous health benefits when feeding your Corgi a diet of real, fresh dog food. With complete and balanced nutrition from NutriCanine, you’ll start to see health benefits in your senior Corgi, including improved digestion, fresher breath, more stable energy levels, reduction of allergies and intolerances, brighter eyes, fresher breath, cleaner and whiter teeth, a stronger immune system, a thicker and glossier coat, less flatulence, and firmer stools, to name a few. Our dog food recipes offer complete and balanced nutrition for your Corgi, with human-edible animal proteins and our unique blend of highly digestible fruits and vegetables. All our dog food recipes are freshly prepared with no hormones, no antibiotics, and no artificial preservatives, colours or flavours.
  • Best Dog Food for an Overweight Corgi
    If your Corgi is experiencing weight issues it’s important to take the necessary steps to get them back to an ideal weight. Proper exercise is important and dog food that’s low in calories. There are numerous health benefits when feeding your Corgi a diet of real, fresh dog food. With complete and balanced nutrition from NutriCanine, you’ll start to see health benefits in your Corgi, including improved digestion, fresher breath, more stable energy levels, reduction of allergies and intolerances, brighter eyes, fresher breath, cleaner and whiter teeth, a stronger immune system, a thicker and glossier coat, less flatulence, and firmer stools, to name a few. NutriCanine dog food recipes also come pre-portioned, making it easy to track your Corgi’s calorie intake.
  • Best Dog Food for a Corgi with a Sensitive Stomach
    Deciding which dog food to feed your Corgi with a sensitive stomach is made easy with NutriCanine. Our gently cooked dog food recipes are specially designed to meet your Corgi’s nutritional needs. With a variety of protein-forward recipes to choose from, a great starting point is our gently cooked beef dog food recipe as it would respond well to your Corgi’s sensitive stomach. This unique blend contains antioxidant-rich berries and highly digestible rice, the perfect formula to strengthen your Corgi’s immune system while reducing any allergies and intolerances. NutriCanine’s meals are freshly prepared with real human-edible, locally sourced ingredients. NutriCanine’s dog food is always free of hormones, antibiotics and preservatives.

Top 10 Facts About Corgis

Learn more about NutriCanine’s meal plans


Nutri canine Meals

Raw Meals

NutriCanine raw meals are meant for families who want their furry friend to eat food that most closely resembles their wild ancestors.

View more raw meals here

Gently Cooked

NutriCanine's gently cooked meals is real food made for your dog. These meals are perfect for families that want to reduce the risk of bacteria from raw food.

View more gently cooked meals here